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John Reeve, operations officer for Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, briefs base senior leaders on destructive winter weather processes on MCB Camp Lejeune, Dec. 3, 2019. Staff were briefed on the processes for base operations in the event of ice or snow storms. Destructive weather briefs take place biannually--prior to the hurricane season in the spring and prior to the winter weather season in December. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Evan Falls)

Each year, key personnel with Marine Corps Installations East-Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, gather to discuss methods on how to best mitigate potential damage to the base and tenant units in the event of destructive winter weather.

A tabletop exercise was held on Dec. 3 at the commanding general’s briefing room in Building 1, where staff were briefed on the processes for base operations in the event of ice or snow storms on MCB Camp Lejeune.

To prepare for winter storms, backup generators are fueled and tested, salt, sand and brine trucks are staged, essential services that are to be maintained during the storm are identified, base and tenant commands are warned and advised and shelters are prepared if necessary.

When a storm is imminent, personnel gather and assess possible hazards and solutions, such as sanding, salting and brining the roads as much as possible before the storm, in order to lessen ice and snow on roads. Plans also include reduction of road traffic, reduction or cessation of activities, nonessential field operations, and preparations to shelter those who lose power or other services.

“The idea is that everyone understands the process that we’ll use to evaluate the circumstances and make the decisions that we’ll make regarding when base services will be interrupted and how we’re going to handle the storm,” said John Reeve, operations officer for MCB Camp Lejeune.

MCB Camp Lejeune leaders work closely with the city of Jacksonville and coordinate with local emergency services in order to avoid any discrepancies or misunderstandings in planning and execution of winter weather contingencies, Reeve said.