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Despite only being at his current unit for six short months, Lance Cpl. David Sigdestad makes the most out of every moment no matter if he is working hard in a field operation or sparring in a martial arts session. “I’ve been on four field operations so far and I like it better than anything else,” said Sigdestad, a data systems specialist with Marine Wing Communications Squadron 28. “We get to work 16-20 hour days at the beginning of it, and then take a breather at the end. It feels like we’ve accomplished something by the time it’s over.” When he’s not working as a data systems specialist for his unit, Sigdestad fills up much of his time with personal endeavors. Whether the challenge is physical or mental, Sigdestad has consistently put his best foot forward. His latest undertaking has been submitting an application to the Marine Security Guard School aboard Marine Corps Base Quantico.

During his first six months since arriving to his current unit, Lance Cpl. David Sigdestad has made the most out of every moment, whether he is working hard in a field operation or sparring in a martial arts session.

"I’ve been on four field operations so far and I like them more than anything else," said Sigdestad. "We get to work 16-20 hour days at the beginning of it, and then take a breather at the end. It feels like we’ve accomplished something by the time it’s over."

When he’s not working as a data systems specialist for his unit, Sigdestad fills his time with personal endeavors. Whether the challenge is physical or mental, Sigdestad has consistently put his best foot forward. His latest undertaking has been submitting an application to the Marine Security Guard School at Marine Corps Base Quantico.

"The biggest thing that excites me about going to school to be a Marine Security Guard is the traveling aspect of it," said Sigdestad. "I have never been anywhere outside the country, let alone traveled the U.S. very much since I joined the Marine Corps. So as soon as I heard about it, I went all in."

If Sigdestad’s submission is accepted, he will be slated to attend the school winter of 2017.

Among other recent challenges, Sigdestad was given the opportunity to compete in a semi-annual squadron event known as the Leonidas Competition. During the competition, participants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in drill and ceremonies, basic Marine Corps knowledge and complete an obstacle course. Sigdestad and one non-commissioned officer from the unit claimed the winning title.

"The trophy is actually a wooden sword that symbolizes the swords given to gladiators when they were set free in ancient times," said Sigdestad. "It correlates with our squadron’s name which is the Spartans. Leonidas was the king of the Spartans, so the whole event really represents unit comradery and strength for all of us and that’s why I competed."

Sigdestad plans to continue his already eventful journey in the Marine Corps, and looks forward to accepting more incredible opportunities the Corps has to offer.